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Vermont Timber Works Blog

Raising A Timber Frame

By Sandy Connolly on November 29, 2013

Once timbers have been cut, applied with finish, organized, and packaged up, it’s time to ship them!

Timbers Ready to GO

Timbers Ready to GO.

Where’s the truck? Has anyone heard from Gordon?  I’ll call him, let’s get these hemlock timbers loaded and get this show on the road.

Timbers on Flat Bed

Timbers on Flat Bed

Now the real fun begins!  If you haven’t witnessed a timber frame raising, I highly recommend it. Seeing the structure take shape is very dramatic.  Especially if it’s your dream house, which for many, it is.

Enjoy these raising pictures which feature King Post Trusses within the design and Queen Post Trusses on each gable end. The timbers for this frame are all traditionally joined.

Jobsite is ready!

Jobsite is ready!

Below is a picture of assembled trusses sitting in a location where it will be easy for the crane to pick them up. Also, the framers are setting the end bent. This barn frame will have a Gambrel roof!

King & Queen Post Trusses

King & Queen Post Trusses

For some frames, an entire bent can be assembled on the ground and craned into place.  This design required a piece-by-piece assembly.

Flying in connector beam with braces

Flying in connector beam with braces

Below is a picture of the final stages of the timber frame raising. The purlins are being installed.

Almost Done!

Almost Done!

What do you think of this barn?  Do you like the Gambrel Roof?  I hear there is going to be a pool table in the game room!  We hope that you enjoyed these progress photos and if you get a chance to view a timber frame raising….do it.  It’s a wonderful experience.

As always, thank you for stopping by our Timber Framers’ Blog. If your interested in a timber frame, or have any timber work questions, we encourage you to get in contact, ask an expert, or share your thoughts in the comment section below!

4 comments
  1. Cheryl Smith says:

    I like the look of the Gambrel roof. It really gives it the look of an old-fashioned barn. It would be fun to see this happen in person. How long does it typically take you to complete a project.

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